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Thursday, 28 May 2015 12:32

Religious leaders call for greater commitment to reducing Australia’s carbon emissions

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ARRCC ark150The Australian Religious Response to Climate Change (ARRCC), a coalition of religious leaders from various faiths, has written to the Prime Minister, and to MPs on both sides of politics, calling for Australia to increase its target for reducing carbon emissions.

The letter was written in response to an issues paper released by the Prime Minister’s Department which refers to Australia’s post-2020 target for reducing emissions that will be put to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change later this year.

The ARRCC's letter commends the government for recognising the importance of Australia contributing to a global agreement but states that ‘this needs to be matched by robust policies.’

The ARRCC is calling for the government to commit to reducing emissions 40% below 1990 levels by 2025, a slightly more ambitious target than that proposed by the Climate Change Authority in its report released in April this year.

The letter states, ‘Australia has the technological and economic capacity to deliver on these policies. It is an opportunity to play our part in addressing the common environmental challenge humanity faces. It would not only create a safer, more stable climate for Australia and other vulnerable countries; it would also bring added economic benefits, through the strengthening of sustainable technology sectors and the creation of new employment opportunities.’

The letter is signed by Ms Jacquie Redmond, Director of Catholic Earthcare Australia, the ecological agency of the Catholic Church in Australia. Other signatories include Anglican Archbishop Philip Freier, Rev Professor Andrew Dutney, President of the Uniting Church of Australia National Assembly, and representatives from the Buddhist, Hindu and Jewish faiths.

Read the letter here.

This article was first published on 27 May 2015 at the website of the Archdiocese of Melbourne.